Mobile health care is further adopted…

Smartphones, connected medical accessories and apps will play an increasing role in primary care and chronic disease management. In 2013, 16% of US consumers had at least one health app on their device. Two years later, 32% did. Millennials, who are enthusiastically embracing wearables and health apps, prefer virtual communication for health interactions. Healthcare’s shift into the palms of consumers’ hands will set off an explosion in new industry needs.
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with an emerging demand for cybersecurity

Medical devices from pacemakers to infusion pumps are becoming more connected, but also more vulnerable to breaches and cyberattacks. The repercussions of a hacked medical device could be devastating, from improper patient treatment, over access to medical data from patients, hospitals, insurers and drug companies (clinical trials), to affected reputations and revenue.
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New databases improve patient care and consumer health

Newer databases make datamining of large patient datasets easier. New big data analysis will offer new insights to drug makers about how their drugs are being used, to pharmacies about these patients’ unique buying patterns, and to the clinicians about how best to treat their patients. Educating patients about data sharing and how health information is being used to improve care delivery and treatment decisions will be critical in addressing privacy concerns.
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More biosimilars become available

The first US biosimilar received FDA approval in 2015, and entered the US market at a 15% discount. At least four biosimilar applications are pending FDA review in 2016, with another 50 in the FDA review process. Half of the top 10 pharmaceutical companies are developing biosimilars. Biosimilars are expected to bring significant price discounts compared with branded versions of biologics. This may bring welcome relief to rising drug costs from expensive specialty drugs and help consumers with high-deductible health plans.
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New ways to manage healthcare cost

As health care gets more expensive, insurers will look for ways to reduce medical costs. Models will be developed where consumers could receive discounts on life insurance premium or accumulate rewards points for engaging in healthy behaviors. This drives the need towards more transparency on pricing and medical performance to select lower-cost, higher-quality doctors and hospitals.
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Hospitals search for new strategies to deliver lower-cost care

Hospitals will look for ways to move away from inpatient care to reduce costs. New facilities, called “bedless” hospitals (hospital outfitted with an emergency room, observation unit, operating rooms and outpatient facilities for specialties such as cardiology, neurology and oncology — but no inpatient beds), could avoid the high fixed costs of inpatient care, but they also reduce wait times and improve the overall experience. Patients will receive care closer to home or even virtually by specialized digital health centers.
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Improved view on medical costs

With billions of dollars going round in healthcare, few providers actually have a detailed insight in the cost of the services they provide. Yet, such data are useful beyond understanding costs, prompting improvements in patient care (e.g. reduced unnecessary medical procedures or duration of patient stays).
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